Net Worth by Age Percentile Rank Calculator [USA]

Rank your net worth to specific age groups to see where you stand or where you project yourself to be in the future. Use the percentiles to compare your net-worth to US households using data from 2013. To use this calculator, enter the age ranges of the head of households you would like to restrict your comparison to and a net worth value to rank with in that age range. Read about how closely this calculator matches official US Treasury published statistics.

If you need help calculating your net worth, try out How to Calculate your Net Worth for a guided tool.  It will ask for you assets, such as stocks and savings accounts, and subtract your liabilities, such as loans, to figure out your net worth for you.  You can take that number back to this page to compare your net worth to others.

Starting Comparison Age:
Ending Comparison Age:
Networth: $

Net Worth Summary Statistics for Households Aged 65 to 74

Net Worth Percentile Rank : A net worth of $0.00 for ages 65 to 74 ranks at the 3.87%
Median Net Worth : $229,800.00
Mean Net Worth : $1,054,417.00
Net Worth 25th - 75th Percentile Ranges : $71,900.00 to $703,000.00

Net Worth Percentiles by Age

For reference, here is how much money you would have to have to rank at certain percentiles for ages 65 to 74
90% $2,112,900.00  
75% $703,000.00  
50% $229,800.00  
25% $71,900.00  
10% $8,170.00  
If you are interested in tracking your net worth over time, I use Personal Capital - The Flexible, Smart Alternative to Quicken (Sponsored Link). Personal Capital will securely connect to your accounts and archive account values so that you can track and optimize your progress in saving. It is free for tracking, but they charge a fee if you want them to manage your assets with a robo-investor.

Net Worth Visualizations

You are in the top 4 percentile. If there were 100 households within the nation who's head of households were between the ages of 65 to 74. 96 households would be have higher wealth than you. 3 households would have lower wealth than your household.

The bubbles represent households and are scaled by household net worth, but they are not fully proportional due to the space required.

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These results are based off of 817 individual samples where the head of household was age 65 to 74 and are weighted to represent 15789150 American households. The SCF is known to be slightly biased towards higher incomes values, which the Federal Reserve attempts to correct for by adjusting the weighting of each individual response. Keep this in mind if the number of responses your output is based off of is low, or if you are looking at the tail ends of the data--like the top 1% or bottom 1%.

The numbers are based off of the results of the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances by the Federal Reserve. I used R to separate one of the five imputations with the sample replicatant weights from the Federal Reserve. If you want to do your own analysis check out the raw data, and also check out this guide on how to import the data into R http://www.r-bloggers.com/analyze-the-survey-of-consumer-finances-scf-with-r/. The number of samples per age vary quite a bit, so you might get unusual results for certain ages.

Net Worth Articles

One interesting tid-bit about net worth is that the median net worth for a 30 year old has dropped by over half in the last 10 years.
Read about the overall distribution of net worth by age.

73 thoughts on “Net Worth by Age Percentile Rank Calculator [USA]”

  1. If you have shelter, food and people to love and love you, you are rich. I’m now worth 7m at 52 and would feel a lot richer if I haven’t started worring about how I am going to keep that equity to pass on. Fact is, beyond basic needs, money isn’t going to bring you much more happiness in life…Just hopefully a bit less stress.

    1. I would argue that time with loved ones, doing the things you love, is the most valuable thing in the world (assuming basic food/shelter), and MONEY IS TIME. I’m still having to work as I don’t yet have enough invested assets to live off of the passive income, and I wish I had that time to spend with my children, especially while they’re still small. However, in order to really have that time, I need more money.

    1. In plain terms…
      (The value of your residence) – (Amount owed against residence) = amount you add to your net worth

    2. I don’t think so! I believe that ONLY cash holdings and net assets of self made people like me should count! The other measurements have WAY too many variables, and include WAY too many BRATS born into privilege, good fortune, and wealth! Living off others is’nt a measurement of your work or wealth, it is a measurement of the sweat equity and wealth of OTHERS whose bodies YOU were fortunate enough to come OUT of!

  2. Some people will go on about how being rich isn’t the same as being happy, and that true wealth is family and the basics and blah blah.
    I think we all get that. But as a person who started with a net worth of negative thousands, to being decently wealthy, I can tell you that wealthy is better.
    Now if you can’t balance your health or time with your family, that’s on you.

    1. I went from broke to financially independent and the challenge I see is when do you take your foot off the gas and start appreciating your limited existence rather than just downing coffees and running to the next meeting. I think I just wrote my longest sentence, check.

  3. I went to college for one year and dropped out because I didn’t want to be average. I am 48 years old and was worth just over $1M at age 30, over $10M at age 37, down to only $4M at age 40 and now north of $30M. I did it investing in real estate. Most people in real estate have wealthy parents but I do not have wealthy parents, I did it myself with hard work and persistence. 40% persistence, 40% salesmanship and 20% intuition. Frugality can make anyone wealthy over time despite what your income is. Even someone making $50k/year can become wealthy if they just spend less than they make and save and let it compound. Most people spend everything they make no matter how much they make and wonder why they aren’t wealthy. The vast majority of doctors and lawyers make a good living but spend it all as fast as they make it and have insignificant net worths. The opposite of this is the mailman who retires as a millionaire because he knew how to live within his means and saves and over time he became wealthy. The media and all of society teaches consipicous consumption as the norm as opposed to deferred gratification which is a recipe for disaster and even our local sate and federal goverments are unable to practice the simple math of spending less money than they bring in. I am hopeful that more people learn how to save or else most people will end up having to eat cat food when they get old because they didn’t save for the future and the government will not have the money to save them!

  4. I had a traditional job for a long time, and ended up with plenty of money to retire on ($2.7M+ invested) + a small pension. It is true that money (by itself) will not make you happy, but MONEY DOES GIVE YOU ONE THING – CHOICES! And when you’re 60, CHOICES CAN MAKE YOU HAPPY! So I guess, indirectly, the choices money provides you, can make you happier. I’m not what I would consider “rich” ($2.7M); had a traditional life with the same wife, 3 daughters (and now 5 grandchildren). I paid for their undergraduate degrees (they all went on to get Masters (paid by employers/state)), so they wouldn’t have to start life out digging out of a debt hole, like I did.

  5. I am reviewing the net worth of millenials age 18 to 30.I find it quite interesting that there are fewer millenials in the 1.3 million to 5 million range then there are in the 5.1 million and above range.Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.By the way your website is excellent.

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